Elizabeth Debicki Measurements Bra Size Height Weight

Biography - A Short Wiki

Elizabeth Debicki’s breasts can be described as petite. Are they real or is it breast implants? Find out down below!

Short Bio
Elizabeth was born August 1990 in Paris, France but her family moved to Melbourne when she was only a kid. Her ancestry is Polish and Irish. She has college degree in Drama from Victorian College of the Arts at University of Melbourne. Debicki started with acting in 2011 with smaller roles but relatively fast gained the attention. 2015 is a real breakthrough year for her since she’ll be playing in severa movies, including The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Kettering Incident, and Everest. Elizabeth’s tall slim figure reminds us of Nicole Kidman, another Australian beauty that made it to Hollywood.

Body Measurements Table

All body measurements and statistics of Elizabeth Debicki, including bra size, cup size, shoe size, height, hips, and weight.

Body shape:Banana
Dress size (US):6
Breasts-Waist-Hips: 35-25-36 inches (89-64-91 cm)
Shoe size (US):11
Bra size: 34A
Cup size (US):A
Height: 6′ 3″ (190 cm)
Weight: 133 lbs (60 kg)
Natural breasts or implants: Natural

Quotes

I’m not a great sleeper. I try and do too many things every day. I think that I get very obsessive about parts and projects. I do let them kind of consume me, and when there’s something on the horizon that I want to be involved in, I just kind of hurtle myself towards it.

Elizabeth Debicki

As a child, I got bored with my surroundings, so I would be another person for a little while.

Elizabeth Debicki

I loved Catherine Deneuve, Sophia Loren, and Ursula Andress. They had an incredible strength but fragility at the same time, especially Catherine Deneuve, who had an aloofness that impressed me.

Elizabeth Debicki

I am very tall, and when you’re a teenager, you want to be like everyone else. I used to slump a lot; it’s very human at that stage to want to be part of the crowd and not want any part of you that is sticking out.

Elizabeth Debicki

Often, female characters are quite one dimensional, especially in a two hour film; television gives characters room to breathe and develop.

Elizabeth Debicki